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Tenant distraught after discovering landlord’s careless destruction of their garden: ‘Will it be okay?’

“It will still grow broccoli, just much less than it would have. Up to you if you want to buy another plant.”

"It will still grow broccoli, just much less than it would have. Up to you if you want to buy another plant."

Photo Credit: iStock

If you’ve ever had a garden, you know that keeping it alive can be hard enough when faced with storms, pests, and hungry critters, let alone harmful human intervention.

One Reddit user shared an image in the r/gardening forum of their broccoli plant that had been nearly destroyed, not by wild animals or severe weather, but by their landlord. 

“My landlord weed whacked my broccoli! Does anyone know if it will still grow broccoli or should I get a new seedling? First time gardener here, TIA!” wrote the poster above the photo. 

"It will still grow broccoli, just much less than it would have. Up to you if you want to buy another plant."
Photo Credit: Reddit

“Will it be okay? This is a massive raised bed, I have almost every vegetable growing on here,” the original poster asked in a comment. 

This is, unfortunately, not a new kind of problem for homeowners across the country.

Landlords have been found trying to prevent renters from introducing lifestyle changes that benefit their wallet and the planet, such as putting in gardens, creating xeriscaped lawns, installing solar panels, or even just hanging clotheslines to dry their laundry

Approximately 74 million people in the United States live in areas managed by a homeowners association, and many of them have been upset by HOA limitations that prevent them from saving money and doing their part to help the Earth.

Some landlords may be open to negotiating established rules with homeowners, specifically those that pertain to eco-friendly home changes

By advocating for these kinds of home improvements within your HOA, you’re not only working toward a healthier planet but also fostering a community that values sustainability and consideration for the well-being of future generations. 

Commenters on the post attempted to advise the original poster, but many suggested that they may need to simply start from scratch with another plant if they want to see a proper yield.

“It will still grow broccoli, just much less than it would have. Up to you if you want to buy another plant,” one Reddit user mentioned

“Yes it will, but if you can get more I would,” a commenter added

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