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Tenant concerned after landlord sprays mystery chemical in the apartment: ‘I’m so worried that my kitty might lick it and get poisoned’

“I didn’t see it so I have no idea where in the house she sprayed or what the chemical is.”

If you have ever lived in a rented household, you've probably had some trouble with landlords at some point.

Photo Credit: iStock

If you have ever lived in a rented household, you’ve probably had some trouble with landlords at some point.

Whether it’s being restricted from making environmentally friendly changes to the property or simply being unable to get minor repairs fixed, it can be a frustrating living situation.

One tenant, though, was upset by the overly proactive measures their landlords took regarding bug prevention.

After requesting that the husband-and-wife landlord team check the bathroom sink, the wife decided to spray for bugs in various areas of the house while the tenant was observing the husband at work.

After the wife returned to the bathroom, the tenant realized what had happened, and they were immediately concerned. 

“I asked her if it was pet-safe and she said ‘oh yeah I’m spraying in places she can’t get to’ (didn’t say anything about what chemical it was or whether it’s actually pet safe),” the tenant wrote on Reddit.

“So it was already done, and I didn’t see it so I have no idea where in the house she sprayed or what the chemical is. I’m so worried that my kitty might lick it and get poisoned.”

Having unknown chemicals sprayed throughout your property is horrendous, but when you also have a pet to care for, the results could be disastrous for your furry friend.

When posting their story to the social media platform, the Redditor asked for advice about whether the bug spray could be toxic for their cat. In addition to getting some useful advice, a couple of commenters also noted that landlords have a responsibility to keep tenants reasonably informed.

“Legally they have to tell you what they sprayed,” one user said. “Some insecticides are very unsafe for cats. It’s why they say not to use dog flea medication for cats. They can’t process the poison through their livers.”

“I think it’s best to contact the landlords and ask them what constitutes of their bug spray,” added another. “Usually once dry, bug sprays aren’t very harmful to pets but pyrethroids and chemicals similar to it might prove to be poisonous.”

So whether it’s finding out exactly what activity has occurred in your property or trying to persuade landlords to change any strict rules they have, communication is key.

Whether you own it or not, a house should feel like a home, and speaking to your landlords to make positive changes can bring huge benefits to your day-to-day life.

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